Bröstochblåsa
Bröstochblåsa
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untrustyou:

Greg Girard
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untrustyou:

Jonathan Smith
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metamuseum:

Mariska Karasz, 1898-1960United States, born HungaryDanubian, 1957Linen, embroidery thread, cotton fabric; assembled, embroidered35 1/2 x 59 1/2 in. (90.2 x 151.1 cm)Purchased by the American Craft Council, 1958
Following the Second World War, Jazz Age New York fashion designer Mariska Karasz turned to embroidered wall hangings and became an advocate for the revival of needlework in America.  She remained inspired throughout her life by her native land of Hungary, referring in this example of her late work to the major river coursing through the country.  Danubian was one of a diverse group of seven works acquired in 1958, the inaugural year of the Museum of Contemporary Crafts (today the Museum of Arts and Design).  The first year’s acquisitions, all created in the 1950s, reflect the emerging studio craft movement in America.

Lyndsay Bratton

Curatorial FellowMuseum of Arts and Designhttp://www.madmuseum.org/
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nikolawashere:

Federico Ortega Sanchez
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vjeranski:

John Ruskin (1819-1900)
clouds
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nemfrog:

Saturn floats. Our Country and Its Resources. 1917.
"Saturn, the lightest of the planets in proportion to its size, would float in water (if there were an ocean big enough to hold it!)"
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thegirlhabit:

by Purienne
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tofuist:

植田正治  Shoji Ueda
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arsvitaest:

Lionel Walden (American, 1861-1933), Cardiff Docks, 1894. Oil on canvas. Musée d’Orsay, Paris.
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books0977:

Mrs. Schermerhorn (1941). Victor Karl Hammer (American, 1882-1967). Tempera on panel. The Wolfsonian–Florida International University.
Mrs. Elizabeth Ker Schermerhorn (American, 1908-1960) is seated; in her hands she is holding a prism and stalks of wheat; bust of a female head at left. Schermerhorn was a woman of privilege who became interested in psychology and studied with Carl Jung. She had her own theories about treating mental illness, and in 1942 she took a job at Rockland State Hospital as a Psychiatric Aide. She held a strong belief that there could be an integration of people with mental illness with people in so-called “normal society.”